Environmentally Friendly - 80% Less Carbon Dioxide

These are examples of how our customers, who soon become our cherished friends and colleagues, have made small changes to what they select for use as mortar and stucco in their applications in order to save extreme amounts of CO2 emissions into our environment.

They are doing this by making Green, "Eco-Friendly" choices and using our full range of Natural Hydraulic Lime, (NHL), Mortars, Stucco, Lime Paint and Lithomex brick and stone fabricating/ patching material. Our products replace the Ordinary Portland Cement, (OPC), used as the conventional binder in building mortar and stucco and substitute it with pure and natural hydraulic limes for many benefits including extreme CO2 savings.


Project:
    Mitchell House
    Blue Hill, Maine

Type:
    Durisol® block house and garage with lime
    stucco

Architect:
    Elliot, Elliot & Nuriellious

Contractor:
    Deer Run Realty Company

Owner:
    Lorenzo and Vicki Mitchell

Products:
    NHL 5

CO2 Saved:
    752.5 pounds


Project:
    Houland Cabin
    Grand Marais, Minnesota

Type:
    Strawbale construction. Lime stucco
    over straw

Architect:
    Boreal Craft

Contractor:
    Boreal Craft

Owner:
    Chris Norman

Products:
    NHL 2, NHL3.5, ® G

CO2 Saved:
    430 pounds


Project:
    Black Horse Inn
    Flourtown, Pennsylvania

Type:
    Historic restoration, lime stucco over stone

Architect:
    Seiler & Drury

Contractor:
    Daley Plastering

Owner:
    The citizens of the United States thanks
    to The Friends of Historic Bethlehem Pike
    and Springfield Township Historic Society

Products:
    NHL3.5, ® G

CO2 Saved:
    520 pounds

  

  



Owner:
   Fred Hubbard
   Conway, Massachusetts

Products:
    ® G DGM 50

CO2 Saved:
    69 pounds

Comments:
Andy, These are pictures of my project. As you can imagine I am quite happy. Your mortar was
a joy to work with, fluffy. It was well handy to mix up a batch with the premixed bag. A convenient size to carry and to use up. Most of the brick are stiles and hart. A very hard brick that I found do not need wetting before use. Whereas the brick around the firebox are antique and were laid as wet as I could make them to develop the proper suction. The firebrick were laid in the proper refractory mortar. The stone in the lintel and
hearth is from nearby Ashfield Stone Co. The firebox was finished in August, I finished outside about three weeks ago. At what point would I start having my small fires? Well for now I'll close. I still have about 15 bags. I'm interested in trying to plaster on some wooden lath. Good luck and thanks, Fred